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Water resources
engineering-services-for-preparation-of-final-plans-and-specifications-for-construction-of-the-24-inch-and-12-inch-recycled-water-pipeline-city-of-lancaster-california
Engineering Services for Preparation of Final Plans and Specifications for Construction of the 24-Inch and 12-Inch Recycled Water Pipeline, City of Lancaster, California
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District

$12 Million

Quality Control Plan; Gather Information; Site Investigation; Desert Environmental Requirements; Preliminary Design; Final Design; Specifications (SpecsIntact); Bidding Schedule (Primavera); Construction Cost Estimates (MCACES-MII); Project Management; ECIFP; Water Distribution Modeling (WaterCAD)

As the prime consultant, DRC completed the preliminary design, final design and contract plans, specifications, and cost estimate for 4½ miles of a 24-inch recycled water transmission main in Division Street, Avenue K, and Sierra Highway and 0.75 miles of a 12-inch pipeline in 10th Street West in the City of Lancaster. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was the lead agency. The city was the project sponsor.

The pipeline, crossing beneath Union Pacific Railroad and the Southern California Regional Rail Authority tracks adjacent to Sierra Highway, required railroad permits and jack and bore construction. The streets contained several underground utility, many unknown, requiring jack and bore beneath some intersections. Environmental design restrictions were in place due to the desert environs. The project design had to consider substantial traffic volume on each street.

DRC completed the design using a QA/QC Plan that documented reviews conducted for compliance with existing laws, policies, and regulations and sound design practices. DRC performed field investigations and technical research, determined easement and right-of-way requirements from existing APN maps, provided preliminary and final designs, prepared final specifications using USACE SpecsIntact, and provided construction cost estimates using the USACE MII cost estimating software.

The design consisted of water system design modeling, contract plans, specifications, cost estimate (MCACES-MII), and engineering considerations and instructions for field personnel. DRC followed the engineering design criteria of Los Angeles County Waterworks District No. 40. Our design services included documenting coordination activities that facilitated the design analysis, design criteria, design documents, contract drawings, and construction support.

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Water resources
north-city-tunnel-connector-project-city-of-san-diego-ca
North City Tunnel Connector Project, City of San Diego, CA
City of San Diego

Identification & location of existing utilities; Technical Specifications; Permitting

The North City Tunnel Project consisted of four pipelines—an 85-inch diameter sanitary sewer line, a 36-inch diameter pressurized reclaimed water pipeline, a 24-inch diameter centerline, and a 54-inch effluent line—each approximately 2,000 feet long in a common tunnel. They extended from the North City Treatment Plant on the I-805’s east side to a drop structure on the I-805’s west side and connected with the south portal of a 48-inch tunnel near La Jolla Village Drive.

D R Consultants (DRC) determined the locations of all known public and private utilities, horizontally and vertically, prepared a list of utilities and contacted each in the project area. Results were summarized in a final report, which documented all anticipated obstructions.

DRC identified permit requirements, contacts, costs, timing for acquisition, and other pertinent information and presented the information in a manual of permit requirements, which responded to the Clean Water Program guidelines for obtaining and initializing permit applications. It also included a master schedule. Permits included:

Section 404 Permits, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

  • Stream Alteration Permits, Dept. of Fish and Game
  • San Diego Air Quality Management District Permit
  • Regional Water Quality Control Board Permits (Section 401 and 402 permits)
  • Coastal Commission Permits
  • City of San Diego Permits and Approvals (engineering and development, planning, police, fire, traffic and building)
  • Other Approvals and Permits (Pacific Bell, San Diego Gas and Electric, CALOSHA, CALTRANS, County Health Department)

DRC developed all of the project’s technical specifications, including administrative and technical elements. DRC produced updates for 60%, 90%, and 100% milestones.

DRC’s construction management and technical support, its responsiveness and sensitivity to the overall construction schedule during the technical planning and permitting phase, contributed significantly to completing the project on time and on budget.

Our experience on large, multi-task projects ensured efficient cost and schedule controls on this project. DRC’s partnering approach with the Clean Water Program, contractors and regulators, established an effective level of communication that contributed to the project’s success.

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Water resources
silver-lake-headworks-reservoir-los-angeles-department-of-water-and-power-ladwp-los-angeles-california
Silver Lake Headworks Reservoir, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), Los Angeles, California
City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP)

Confidential

Research; Design Yard Piping; Coordination Meetings; Project Management; Hydrology and Hydraulic Planning; QA/QC; Cost Estimates; Construction Support and Management; LADWP Office Support;

DRC’s services for LADWP’s Silver Lake Headworks project included designs of the inlet pipelines, outlet pipelines, air vacuum vault, underslab drains, rooftop drains, a discharge pipe to the adjacent river, drainage facilities, and other miscellaneous designs.

During the preliminary design phase, DRC recommended eliminating the air vacuum vault and realigning several pipelines, demonstrating that those facilities were unnecessary. LADWP staff evaluated and accepted DRC’s recommendation and designs. Below is a commendation:

“By the way, DRC’s Dr. [Fang Maw] Lee more than justified his pay (in the short time that he worked with us) with his idea of removing from the design the ‘air gap’ vault. After a careful evaluation of his suggestion, we [concluded] that in fact the air gap vault was not needed. This design change, in my opinion, will save LADWP at least a couple of million dollars in construction and a few more million in operation costs during the life of the project.”

Raul Banuelos, PE, Manager of Major Projects Water Engineering & Technical Services Div., Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

 The LADWP contracted a member of DRC’s senior staff to provide shoring design during the excavation of the project’s Hydroelectric Power Station, which was difficult due to the site’s wet soil conditions. The excavation is approximately 35 feet deep, 270 feet long, and 70 to 80 feet wide. The shoring consists of steel soldier piles and timber lagging with grouted anchors (tiebacks) in the soil around the excavation.

 

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Water resources
silver-lake-headworks-reservoir-los-angeles-department-of-water-and-power-ladwp-los-angeles-california-2
Silver Lake Headworks Reservoir, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), Los Angeles, California
City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP)

Confidential

Research; Design Yard Piping; Coordination Meetings; Project Management; Hydrology and Hydraulic Planning; QA/QC; Cost Estimates; Construction Support and Management; LADWP Office Support

DRC’s services for LADWP’s Silver Lake Headworks project included designs of the inlet pipelines, outlet pipelines, air vacuum vault, underslab drains, rooftop drains, a discharge pipe to the adjacent river, drainage facilities, and other miscellaneous designs.

During the preliminary design phase, DRC recommended eliminating the air vacuum vault and realigning several pipelines, demonstrating that those facilities were unnecessary. LADWP staff evaluated and accepted DRC’s recommendation and designs. Below is a commendation:

 “By the way, DRC’s Dr. [Fang Maw] Lee more than justified his pay (in the short time that he worked with us) with his idea of removing from the design the ‘air gap’ vault. After a careful evaluation of his suggestion, we [concluded] that in fact the air gap vault was not needed. This design change, in my opinion, will save LADWP at least a couple of million dollars in construction and a few more million in operation costs during the life of the project.”

 Raul Banuelos, PE, Manager of Major Projects Water Engineering & Technical Services Div., LADWP

The LADWP contracted a member of DRC’s senior staff to provide shoring design during the excavation of the project’s Hydroelectric Power Station, which was difficult due to the site’s wet soil conditions. The excavation is approximately 35 feet deep, 270 feet long, and 70 to 80 feet wide. The shoring consists of steel soldier piles and timber lagging with grouted anchors (tiebacks) in the soil around the excavation.

Water resources
griffith-park-fern-dell-drive-facility-water-distribution-system-design-los-angeles-ca
Griffith Park – Fern Dell Drive Facility, Water Distribution System Design, Los Angeles, CA
City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

Civil Engineering; Pumping/Piping Design; Electrical Engineering; Instrumentation & Control; Aesthetic Design/Sustainability; Project Administration; Construction Drawings; Construction Details; Equipment Lists; Construction Oversight

DRC designed and oversaw construction of an aesthetically pleasing, permanent man-made stream and water feature in Griffith Park. LADWP operates the Fern Dell Drive Facility water feature, a popular picnic and walking destination for the park’s visitors.

Our team produced a detailed design and construction package that included all necessary construction drawings, details, and equipment lists. The feature consists of a stream lined with cedars, pines, and other flora and fauna and incorporates small waterfalls, pools, and bridges.

Its water supply comes from a municipal water line as a closed system, re-circulating water continuously with a pumping station and a piping network to the existing creek. Under the configuration, the storm water outlet from the system is not available for routine flushing, but only during storm events that exceed the facility’s capacity. The existing storm water bypass channel is being maintained. The pipeline extends from the pump station at the downstream end of the creek to an existing pond just above a playground at the upper end of the facility.

The Fern Dell system has a series of weirs that facilitate a 190-foot elevation drop. These features generate sufficient aeration to prevent concentrations of dissolved oxygen.

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Water resources
climate-change-study-on-the-los-angeles-aqueduct-system-los-angeles-department-of-water-and-power-ladwp-los-angeles-california
Climate Change Study on the Los Angeles Aqueduct System, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), Los Angeles, California
City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP)

Confidential

Research and Review; Coordination Meetings; Adaptation Measures; Below Ground Aquifer Identification; Above Ground Storage Identification; Development Support; Infrastructure Identification; General Operational Analysis; Cost Estimates

DRC reviewed draft reports regarding the hydrologic and hydraulic modeling performed under future climate change scenarios and identified specific scenarios to be considered for adaptation planning. The goal was to develop conceptual-level information.

Our team identified two locations along the Los Angeles Aqueduct for potential aquifer storage and recovery sites to provide 400,000 acre-feet of underground storage and developed above ground infrastructure requirements for transporting, temporarily storing, and recovering water for those sites. The storage sites were to be within 10 miles of the aqueduct. DRC worked from U.S. Geological Survey maps, other topographic maps, and information provided by the client. DRC provided conceptual design and cost estimates for the above ground and underground injection infrastructure.

DRC identified opportunities for increasing or providing surface storage in at least two locations and identified existing reservoir sites for analysis. We developed pipeline infrastructure, aqueduct connections, gravity flow investigations, and other conceptual-level information, including costs, for conveyance to the site from the Aqueduct.

DRC also identified opportunities to enhance conveyance capacity of the Los Angeles Aqueduct immediately downstream of Haiwee Reservoir, including developing conceptual designs and cost estimates.

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